Click here for search results
How reliable and consistent are subjective measures of welfare in Europe and Central Asia ? evidence from the second life in transition survey
 
Author:Cojocaru, Alexandru; Diagne, Mame Fatou; Collection Title:Policy Research working paper ; no. WPS 6359
Country:Europe and Central Asia; Date Stored:2013/02/13
Document Date:2013/02/01Document Type:Policy Research Working Paper
SubTopics:Access to Finance; Economic Theory & Research; Rural Poverty Reduction; Inequality; Investment and Investment ClimateLanguage:English
Region:Europe and Central AsiaReport Number:WPS6359
Volume No:1 of 1  

Summary: This paper analyzes the reliability and consistency of subjective well-being measures. Using the Life in Transition Survey, which was administered in 34 countries of Europe and Central Asia in 2006 and 2010, the paper evaluates subjective well-being measures (satisfaction with life and subjective relative income position) against objective measures of welfare based on consumption and assets. It uses the different formulations of life satisfaction in the survey to test robustness to alternative framing and scaling. It also explores within-household differences in subjective well-being assessments. The analysis finds that subjective relative income is weakly correlated with household relative welfare position as measured by consumption or assets. Life satisfaction, by contrast, is highly correlated with objective and subjective measures of household welfare. It generally reflects cross-country differences in average consumption, assets, or per capita gross domestic product, although Central Asian countries report much higher life satisfaction levels than their incomes would suggest. Two alternative measures of life satisfaction are highly correlated and the correspondence between verbal and numeric scales is strong within a country or groupings of similar countries. Within households, subjective assessments of relative income are roughly consistent but measurement error is correlated with individual characteristics (gender and age of respondents), which could cause systematic biases in the analysis.

Official Documents
Official, scanned versions of documents (may include signatures, etc.)
File TypeDescriptionFile Size (mb)
PDF 32 pagesOfficial version*2.24 (approx.)
TextText version**
How To Order

* The official version is derived from scanning the final, paper copy of the document and is the official,
archived version including all signatures, charts, etc.
** The text version is the OCR text of the final scanned version and is not an accurate representation of the final text.
It is provided solely to benefit users with slow connectivity.



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/GK46RABCY0