Click here for search results
How vulnerable are Arab countries to global food price shocks ?, Volume 1
 
Author:Ianchovichina, Elena; Loening, Josef; Wood, Christina A.; Collection Title:Policy Research working paper ; no. WPS 6018
Country:Middle East and North Africa; Date Stored:2012/03/29
Document Date:2012/03/01Document Type:Policy Research Working Paper
SubTopics:Markets and Market Access; Emerging Markets; Currencies and Exchange Rates; Food & Beverage Industry; Food SecurityLanguage:English
Region:Middle East and North AfricaReport Number:WPS6018
Volume No:1  

Summary: This paper presents new estimates of pass-through coefficients from international to domestic food prices by country in the Middle East and North Africa. The estimates indicate that, despite the use of food price subsidies and other government interventions, a rise in global food prices is transmitted to a significant degree into domestic food prices in many countries in the Middle East and North Africa, although cross-country variation is significant. In nearly all countries, domestic food prices are highly downwardly rigid. The finding of asymmetric price transmission suggests that not only international food price levels matter, but also food price volatility. High food pass-through tends to increase inflation pressures, where food consumption shares are high. Domestic factors, often linked to storage, logistics, and procurement, have also played a major role in explaining high food inflation in the majority of countries in the region.

Official Documents
Official, scanned versions of documents (may include signatures, etc.)
File TypeDescriptionFile Size (mb)
PDF 36 pagesOfficial version*2.52 (approx.)
TextText version**
How To Order

* The official version is derived from scanning the final, paper copy of the document and is the official,
archived version including all signatures, charts, etc.
** The text version is the OCR text of the final scanned version and is not an accurate representation of the final text.
It is provided solely to benefit users with slow connectivity.



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/61LTSP7DF0