Click here for search results
Optimal food price stabilization in a small open developing country, Volume 1
 
Author:Gouel, Christophe; Jean, Sebastien; Collection Title:Policy Research working paper ; no. WPS 5943Paper is funded by the Knowledge for Change Program (KCP)
Country:World; Date Stored:2012/01/10
Document Date:2012/01/01Document Type:Policy Research Working Paper
SubTopics:Markets and Market Access; Economic Theory & Research; Emerging Markets; Trade Policy; Access to MarketsLanguage:English
Major Sector:Industry and tradeRel. Proj ID:1W-Market Access Research -- -- P111070;
Region:The World RegionReport Number:WPS5943
Sub Sectors:Other domestic and international tradeVolume No:1

Summary: In poor countries, most governments implement policies aiming to stabilize the prices of staple foods, which often include storage and trade measures insulating their domestic market from the world market. It is of crucial importance to understand the precise motivations and efficiency of those interventions, because they can have consequences worldwide. This paper addresses those issues by analyzing the case of a small, open developing country confronted by shocks to both the crop yield and foreign price. In this model, government interventions may be justified by the lack of an insurance market for food prices. Considering this market imperfection, the authors design optimal public interventions through trade and storage policies. They show that an optimal trade policy largely consists of subsidizing imports and taxing exports, which benefits consumers at the expense of producers. Import subsidies alleviate the non-negativity of food storage. In other words, when stocks are exhausted, subsidizing imports prevents domestic price spikes. One striking result: an optimal storage policy on its own is detrimental to consumers, since its stabilizing benefits leak into the world market and it raises the average domestic price. By contrast, an optimal combination of storage and trade policies results in a powerful stabilizing effect for domestic food prices.

Official Documents
Official, scanned versions of documents (may include signatures, etc.)
File TypeDescriptionFile Size (mb)
PDF 39 pagesOfficial version*2.73 (approx.)
TextText version**
How To Order

See documents related to this project
* The official version is derived from scanning the final, paper copy of the document and is the official,
archived version including all signatures, charts, etc.
** The text version is the OCR text of the final scanned version and is not an accurate representation of the final text.
It is provided solely to benefit users with slow connectivity.



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/1NBMQSZEY0