Click here for search results
Quantifying the value of U.S. tariff preferences for developing countries, Volume 1
 
Author:Dean, Judith M.; Wainio, John; Country:United States; World;
Date Stored:2006/07/26Document Date:2006/08/01
Document Type:Policy Research Working PaperSubTopics:Economic Theory & Research; Agribusiness & Markets; Free Trade; Trade Policy; Insurance & Risk Mitigation
Language:EnglishRegion:Rest Of The World; The World Region
Report Number:WPS3977Collection Title:Policy, Research working paper ; no. WPS 3977
Volume No:1  

Summary: In recent debates, trade preference erosion has been viewed by some as damaging to developing countries, and by others as insignificant, except in a few cases. But little data have been available to back either view. The objective of this paper is to improve our measures of the size, utilization, and value of all U.S. nonreciprocal trade preference programs in order to shed light on this debate. Highly disaggregated data are used to quantify the margins, coverage, utilization, and value of agricultural and nonagricultural tariff preferences for all beneficiary countries in the U.S. regional programs and in the Generalized System of Preferences. Results show that U.S. regional tariff preference programs are generally characterized by high coverage of beneficiary countries'exports, high utilization by beneficiary countries, and low tariff preference margins (except on apparel). For 29 countries, the value of U.S. tariff preferences was 5 percent or more of 2003 dutiable exports to the United States, even after incorporating actual utilization. Most of this value is attributable to nonagricultural tariff preferences, and to apparel preferences in particular. These results suggest that preference erosion may be significant for more countries than many had thought.

Official Documents
Official, scanned versions of documents (may include signatures, etc.)
File TypeDescriptionFile Size (mb)
PDF 39 pagesOfficial version*0.37
TextText version**
How To Order

* The official version is derived from scanning the final, paper copy of the document and is the official,
archived version including all signatures, charts, etc.
** The text version is the OCR text of the final scanned version and is not an accurate representation of the final text.
It is provided solely to benefit users with slow connectivity.



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/WF31DJ4AH0