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The role of parliaments in curbing corruption, Volume 1
 
Author:Stapenhurst, Rick [edited]; Johnston, Niall [edited]; Pelizzo, Riccardo [edited]; Ulrich, Martin; Strohal, Severin; Kaufmann, Daniel; Dininio, Phyllis; Lederman, Daniel; Loayza, Norman V.; Soares, Rodrigo R.; Kpundeh, Sahr; Pope, Jeremy; Matiangi, Fred; Wehner, Joachim; Titsworth, Jack; Macdonell, Rod; Pesic, Milica; Smith, John; Heilbrunn, John; Stasinopoulou, Katia; Johnston, Michael; Pinto-Duschinsky, Michael; Mawer, Sir Philip; Williams, John; Marshall, Denis; Kiljunen, Kimmo; Hopkinson, Nicholas; Country:World;
Date Stored:2006/09/11Document Date:2006/09/01
Document Type:PublicationSubTopics:Governance Indicators; Public Sector Corruption & Anticorruption Measures; Parliamentary Government; National Governance; Corruption & Anticorruption Law
ISBN:ISBN 0-8213-6723-4Language:English
Region:The World RegionReport Number:37263
Collection Title:WBI Development Studies.Volume No:1

Summary: In most countries, Parliament has the constitutional mandate to both oversee government and to hold government to account; often, audit institutions, ombuds and anti-corruption agencies report to parliament, as a means of ensuring both their independence from government and reinforcing parliament's position at the apex of accountability institutions. At the same time, parliaments can also play a key role in promoting accountability, through constituency outreach, public hearings, and parliamentary commissions.

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