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Using financial futures in trading and risk management, Volume 1
 
Author:Mas, Ignacio; Saa-Requejo, Jesus; Collection Title:Policy, Research working paper ; no. WPS 1432
Date Stored:1995/03/01Document Date:1995/03/31
Document Type:Policy Research Working PaperSubTopics:International Terrorism & Counterterrorism; Non Bank Financial Institutions; Payment Systems & Infrastructure; Economic Theory & Research; Banks & Banking Reform; Commodities; Securities Markets Policy & Regulation
Language:EnglishMajor Sector:Finance
Report Number:WPS1432Sub Sectors:Other Finance
Volume No:1  

Summary: The authors explain the features of an array of futures contracts and their basic pricing relationships and describe a few applications to show how investors and risk managers can use these contracts. Futures - and derivatives generally - allow economic agents to fine-tune the structure of their assets and liabilities to suit their risk preferences and market expectations. Futures are not a financing or investment vehicle per se, but a tool for transferring price risks associated with fluctuations in asset values. Some may use them to spread risk, others to take on risk. Financial futures (along with options) are best viewed as building blocks. Futures have facilitated the modern trend of separating conventional financial products into their basic components. They allow not only the reduction of transformation of investment risk but also the understanding and measurement of risk. The market for derivatives has grown enormously over the past decade. The value of exchange-traded eurodollar derivatives (futures and options) is equal to roughly 13 times the value of the underlying market. The volume of trading in financial futures now dwarfs the volume in traditional agricultural contracts. As emerging markets develop, given their inherently risky nature, expect financial futures to play a prominent role in risk management.

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