Click here for search results
The developing world's bulging (but vulnerable) "middle class"
 
Author:Ravallion, Martin; Collection Title:Policy Research working paper ; no. WPS 4816
Country:World; Date Stored:2009/01/12
Document Date:2009/01/01Document Type:Policy Research Working Paper
Language:EnglishRegion:The World Region
Report Number:WPS4816SubTopics:Achieving Shared Growth; Rural Poverty Reduction; Inequality; Population Policies; Services & Transfers to Poor
Volume No:1 of 1  

Summary: The "developing world's middle class" is defined here as those who are not poor when judged by the median poverty line of developing countries, but are still poor by US standards. The "Western middle class" is defined as those who are not poor by US standards. Although barely 80 million people in the developing world entered the Western middle class over 1990-2002, economic growth and distributional shifts allowed an extra 1.2 billion people to join the developing world's middle class. Four-fifths came from Asia, and half from China. Most of the new entrants remained fairly close to poverty, with incomes now bunched up just above $2 a day. The vulnerability of this new middle class to aggregate economic contractions is evident in the fact that one in six people in the developing world live between $2 and $3 per day. Over time, the developing world has become more sharply divided between countries with a large middle class and those with a relatively small one, with Africa prominent in the latter group. Poor people in countries with smaller middle classes may well be more exposed to slowing economic growth.

Official Documents
Official, scanned versions of documents (may include signatures, etc.)
File TypeDescriptionFile Size (mb)
PDF 30 pagesOfficial version*2.1 (approx.)
TextText version**
How To Order

* The official version is derived from scanning the final, paper copy of the document and is the official,
archived version including all signatures, charts, etc.
** The text version is the OCR text of the final scanned version and is not an accurate representation of the final text.
It is provided solely to benefit users with slow connectivity.



Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/U4HV2Q12M0