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International economic activities and the demand for skilled labor: evidence from Brazil and China
 
Author:Fajnzylber, Pablo; Fernandes,Ana Margarida; Collection Title:Policy Research working paper series ; no. WPS 3426
Country:Brazil; China; Date Stored:2004/11/03
Document Date:2004/10/01Document Type:Policy Research Working Paper
SubTopics:Environmental Economics & Policies; Work & Working Conditions; Economic Theory & Research; Labor Standards; Health Monitoring & Evaluation; Public Health PromotionLanguage:English
Region:East Asia and Pacific; Latin America & CaribbeanReport Number:WPS3426
Volume No:1 of 1  

Summary: Increases in international economic integration can lead to greater specialization according to comparative advantage, but also to the diffusion of skill-biased technologies. In developing countries characterized by relative abundance of unskilled labor, these factors can have opposite effects on the relative demand for skilled labor. This paper investigates the impact of the use of imported inputs, exports and foreign direct investment on the demand for skilled workers of Brazilian and Chinese manufacturing plants. We find that while in Brazil increased levels of international integration are associated with an increased demand for skilled labor, the opposite is true in China.

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