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The role of tropical forests in supporting biodiversity and hydrological integrity: a synoptic overview, Volume 1
 
Author:Douglas, Ellen M.; Sebastian, Kate; Vorosmarty, Charles J.; Wood, Stanley; Chomitz, Kenneth M.; Country:World;
Date Stored:2005/06/14Document Date:2005/06/01
Document Type:Policy Research Working PaperSubTopics:Wetlands; Climate Change and Environment; Earth Sciences & GIS; Drylands & Desertification; Forestry
Language:EnglishRegion:The World Region
Report Number:WPS3635Collection Title:Policy, Research working paper ; no. WPS 3635
Volume No:1  

Summary: Conservation of high-biodiversity tropical forests is sometimes justified on the basis of assumed hydrological benefits - in particular, the reduction of flooding hazards for downstream floodplain populations. However, the "far-field" link between deforestation and distant flooding has been difficult to demonstrate empirically. This simulation study assesses the relationship between forest cover and hydrology for all river basins intersecting the world's tropical forest biomes. The study develops a consistent set of pan-tropical land cover maps gridded at one-half degree latitude and longitude. It integrates these data with existing global biogeophysical data. The study applies the Water Balance Model - a coarse-scale process-based hydrological model - to assess the impact of land cover changes on runoff. It quantifies the impacts of forest conversion on biodiversity and hydrology for two scenarios - historical forest conversion and the potential future conversion of the most threatened remaining tropical forests. A worst-case scenario of complete conversion of the most threatened of the remaining forested areas would mean the loss of another three million km2 of tropical forests. Increased annual yield from the conversion of threatened tropical forests would be less than 5 percent of contemporary yield in aggregate. However, about 100 million people - 80 million of them in floodplains - would experience increases of more than 25 percent in annual water flows. This might be associated with commensurate increases in peak flows, though further analysis would be necessary to gauge the impact on flooding. The study highlights basins in Southeast Asia, southern China, and Latin America that warrant further study.

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