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World Development Report 2013: Jobs

About the 2013 World Development Report on Jobs

© Gennadiy Ratushenko / World BankThe World Development Report 2013: Jobs stresses the role of strong private sector led growth in creating jobs and outlines how jobs that do the most for development can spur a virtuous cycle. The report finds that poverty falls as people work their way out of hardship and as jobs empower women to invest more in their children. Efficiency increases as workers get better at what they do, as more productive jobs appear, and as less productive ones disappear. Societies flourish as jobs foster diversity and provide alternatives to conflict.

Learn more about the WDR Team »

Questions asked in the Report

Drying peppers © Curt Carnemar k / World Bank

Growth strategies or jobs strategies?

Find out » (pdf)

Street venter © Steve McCurry / Magnum Photos

Can entrepreneurship be fostered?

Find out » (pdf)

Shopkeeper © Ayemoba Godswill / World Bank

Can policies contribute to social cohesion?

Find out » (pdf)

Workers © World Bank

Skills or jobs—what comes first?

Find out » (pdf)

Farmers © World Bank

A targeted investment climate?

Find out » (pdf)

Employees Piotr © Malecki  l via Panos Pictures

Competing for jobs?

Find out » (pdf)

Rural migrants © Curt Carnemark / World Bank

Protecting workers or protecting jobs?

Find out » (pdf)

Worker © World Bank

How to accelerate the reallocation of workers?

Find out » (pdf)

Data

1.6 billion people working for a wage or a salary

1.5 billion people working in farming and self-employment

77% labor force participation by women in Vietnam

28% labor force participation by women in Pakistan

39% of the manufacturing jobs are in microenterprises in Chile

97% of the manufacturing jobs are in microenterprises in Ethiopia

2x employment growth in a firm in Mexico over 35 years

10x employment growth in a firm in the United States over 35 years

115 million children working in hazardous conditions

21
million victims of forced labor

600 million jobs needed over 15 years to keep current employment rates

90
million people working abroad

621 million youth neither working nor studying

22x the productivity gap between manufacturing firms in the 90th and 10th percentiles in India

9x the productivity gap between manufacturing firms in the 90th and 10th percentiles in the United States

10 million entrants to the labor force per year in Sub-Saharan Africa

30 million postsecondary students in China

3% international migrants as a share of the world population

60% foreign-born population in Kuwait, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates




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