Click here for search results

Books published in 2008

Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Latin America
Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Latin AmericaEdited by Alberto Valdes, Kym Anderson, October 2008
Download  | Purchase the book

The vast majority of the world's poorest households depend on farming for their livelihood. During the 1960s and 1970s, most developing countries imposed pro-urban and anti-agricultural policies, while many high-income countries restricted agricultural imports and subsidized their farmers. Both sets of policies inhibited economic growth and poverty alleviation in developing countries. Although progress has been made over the past two decades to reduce those policy biases, many trade- and welfare-reducing price distortions remain between agriculture and other sectors as well as within the agricultural sector of both rich and poor countries.

Comprehensive empirical studies of the disarray in world agricultural markets first appeared approximately 20 years ago. Since then the OECD has provided estimates each year of market distortions in high-income countries, but there has been no comparable estimates for the world's developing countries. This volume is the second in a series that not only fills that void for recent years but extends the estimates in a consistent and comparable way back in time -and provides analytical narratives for scores of countries that shed light on the evolving nature and extent of policy interventions over the past half-century.

Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Latin America provides an overview of the evolution of distortions to agricultural incentives caused by price and trade policies in the economies of South America, plus the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Mexico. Together these countries constitute about 80 percent of the region’s population, agricultural output, and overall GDP. The title assesses the successes and failures of the past and evaluates policy options for the years ahead. More about Distortions to Agricultural Incentives >>


Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Europe's Transition Economies
for Books pageEdited by Kym Anderson and Johan Swinnen, June 2008
Download | Purchase the book 

This book provides an overview of the evolution of distortions to agricultural incentives caused by price and trade policies in the economies of Eastern Europe and Central Asia (ECA) that are transitioning away from central planning. It includes country and sub-regional studies of the ten transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe that joined the European Union in 2004 or 2007, of seven other large member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), and of Turkey. Sectoral, trade and exchange rate policies in this region have been changed hugely since the dissolving of the Soviet Union in 1991, but much remains to be done to reduce trade barriers, and with it the anti-export bias in the policy regime of especially those countries exporting primary products. To progress reform - and to see how recent policies line up with those of the European Union (EU) - requires better information on the extent of progress during the past fifteen years and of current policy influences on incentives within and between sectors. Prior to their transition to market economies, policies in ECA countries greatly distorted producer and consumer incentives, especially for agricultural products. While those distortions have been reduced substantially in several countries, large variations remain - and distortions appear to be growing again in some of the countries. This book provides the necessary stocktake required for these countries - policymakers to be able to move reforms forward in an informed way. More about Distortions to Agricultural Incentives >>

 

Back to the main Books page >>

Last updated on Aug 13, 2010




Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/43DRRZBK30