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Human Development and Public Services

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Overview

This research program spans the full gamut of human development — education, health, labor markets, and social protection. It examines the performance of the sectors in terms of levels and inequalities in utilization, quality and outcomes, as well as methods for improving performance, whether aimed at households, service providers, politicians and policymakers, or donors.    More »

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Changes in addressing inequalities in access to hospital care in Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra states of India: a difference-in-differences study using repeated cross-sectional surveys
M. Rao, A. Katyal, P. V. Singh, A. Samarth, S. Bergkvist, M. Kancharla, A. Wagstaff, G. Netuveli and A. Renton
BMJ Open 4(6):1-15, June 2014.
Objectives To compare the effects of the Rajiv Aarogyasri Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh (AP) with health financing innovations including the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) in Maharashtra (MH) over time on access to and out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE) on hospital inpatient care.

Are Health Shocks Different? Evidence from a Multishock Survey in Laos
Adam Wagstaff and Magnus Lindelow
Health Economics 23(6): 706-18, June 2014.
This research uses a randomized trial to evaluation the impact of two school feeding schemes on health outcomes of pre-school age children in Burkina Faso.

Building or Bypassing Recipient Country Systems: Are Donors Defying the Paris Declaration?
Stephen Knack
The Journal of Development Studies(Published online: 21 Mar 2014
The recent global financial crisis placed new economic and fiscal pressures on donor countries that may have long-term effects on their ability and willingness to provide aid. Not only did donor-country incomes fall, but the cause of the drop — the banking and financial-sector crisis — may exacerbate the long-term effect on aid flows. This paper estimates how donor-country banking crises have affected aid flows in the past, using panel data from 24 donor countries between 1977 and 2010.

Can Civil Society Overcome Government Failure in Africa?
Shantayanan Devarajan, Stuti Khemani, Michael Walton
World Bank Research Observer 29(1): 20-47, February 2014.
Government failures are widespread in Africa. Symptoms include absentee teachers, leakage of public funds, monopolized trucking, and employment-restricting regulations. Can civil society do anything about these failures? Would external donor support to civil society help?

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Stratified randomization and the FIFA World Cup
Damien de Walque, June 2014
When I start working on a new impact evaluation, I often begin with a workshop in the country where the study will be conducted. The workshop brings together government officials, both at the central level and from the regions and provinces where the intervention will take place, other stakeholders such as NGOs or other UN organizations, and representatives of the research institution that will implement the survey. Part of the workshop is devoted to teaching or refreshing memories about evaluation techniques.

Jishnu and Shanta Talk Transfers
Shanta Devarajan and Jishnu Das, January 2014
Shanta: Jishnu, your blog post and mine on cash transfers generated a lot of comments. Some people argued that giving poor people cash will not “work” because they will spend it on consumption rather than on their children’s education, which is something we care about. What do you have to say to that?

Is Workfare Really Cost-Effective?
Rinku Murgai, Martin Ravallion, and Dominique van de Walle, Research Brief, Winter 2014
With participants’ forgone earnings factored in, workfare may be less cost-effective against poverty than other options

Youth Employment—A Fundamental Challenge for African Economies
Deon Filmer, Africa Can Blog, January 2014
In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s sprawling capital, Mulu Warsa has found a formal-sector job as a factory worker thanks to her high school education. In Niamey, a city at the heart of the Sahel region, Mohamed Boubacar is a young apprentice training to be a carpenter. And in Sagrosa, a village in Kenya’s remote Tana Delta district, Felix Roa, who works on a family farm and runs a small shop, dreams of a better life if he can find the money to expand the business and move to a more urban area. His family is too poor to support him through secondary school.

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Youth Employment in SSAYouth Employment in Sub-Saharan Africa
January 2014 - The report examines obstacles faced by households and firms in meeting the youth employment challenge. It focuses primarily on productivity, in agriculture, in nonfarm household enterprises (HEs), and in the modern wage sector, because productivity is the key to higher earnings as well as to more stable, less vulnerable, livelihoods. To respond to the policy makers' dilemma, the report identifies specific areas where government intervention can reduce those obstacles to productivity for households and firms, leading to brighter employment prospects for youth, their parents, and their own children.
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Risking Your Health: Causes, Consequences, and Interventions to Prevent Risky Behaviors
November 2013 – Individuals all over the worlds engage in behaviors that are risky for their health: smoking, drugs, alcohol, unhealthy food, and risky sexual encounters. They increasingly affect the health of individual and their populations. This report examines the causes, consequences and interventions to prevent these growing threats.
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The Elderly and Old Age in Rural ChinaThe Elderly and Old Age Support in Rural China
March 2012 - This book examines projected demographic changes that will affect the economic well-being of China’s rural elderly over the next 20 years, taking into account both China’s sharp demographic transition and the continued migration of young adults to cities. The projected old age dependency ratio of 34 percent in China’s rural areas by 2030 suggests that support of the elderly is likely to be an increasing burden on China’s families.

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World Bank Lending and the Quality of Economic Policy
Lodewijk Smets, Stephen Knack
Subsidized voluntary enrollment in government-run health insurance schemes is often proposed as a way of increasing coverage among informal sector workers and their families. This paper reports the results of a cluster randomized control trial in which 3,000 households in 20 communes in Vietnam were randomly assigned at baseline to a control group or one of three treatments: an information leaflet about Vietnam’s government-run scheme and the benefits of health insurance; a voucher entitling eligible household members to 25 percent off their annual premium; and both.
Working Paper 6924, June 2014

Encouraging Health Insurance for the Informal Sector: A Cluster Randomized Trial
Adam Wagstaff, Ha Thi Hong Nguyen, Huyen Dao, Sarah Bales
Subsidized voluntary enrollment in government-run health insurance schemes is often proposed as a way of increasing coverage among informal sector workers and their families. This paper reports the results of a cluster randomized control trial in which 3,000 households in 20 communes in Vietnam were randomly assigned at baseline to a control group or one of three treatments: an information leaflet about Vietnam’s government-run scheme and the benefits of health insurance; a voucher entitling eligible household members to 25 percent off their annual premium; and both.
Working Paper 6910, June 2014

Progress toward the health MDGs: are the poor being left behind?
Adam Wagstaff, Caryn Bredenkamp, Leander R. Buisman
This paper looks at differential progress on the health Millennium Development Goals between the poor and better-off within countries. The findings are based on original analysis of 235 Demographic and Health Surveys and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, spanning 64 developing countries over the period 1990-2011. Five health status indicators and seven intervention indicators are tracked for all the health Millennium Development Goals. In most countries, the poorest 40 percent have made faster progress than the richest 60 percent. On average, relative inequality in the Millennium Development Goal indicators has been falling.
Working Paper 6894, May 2014

Effects of Interventions to Raise Voluntary Enrollment in a Social Health Insurance Scheme: A Cluster Randomized Trial
Joseph J. Capuno, Aleli D. Kraft, Stella Quimbo, Carlos R. Tan, Jr., Adam Wagstaff
A cluster randomized controlled trial was undertaken, testing two sets of interventions to encourage enrollment in the Philippines' Individual Payer Program. Of 243 municipalities, 179 were randomly assigned as intervention sites and 64 as controls. In early 2011, 2,950 families were interviewed; unenrolled Individual Payer Program-eligible families in intervention sites were given an information kit and a 50 percent premium subsidy until the end of 2011.
Working Paper 6893, May 2014

The Impact of a Pay-for-Performance Scheme on Prescription Quality in Rural China: An Impact Evaluation
Xiaojie Sun, Xiaoyun Liu, Qiang Sun, Winnie Yip, Adam Wagstaff, Qingyue Meng
In China, health care providers have traditionally been paid fee-for-service and overprescribing and high out-of-pocket spending are common. In this study, township health centers in two counties were assigned almost randomly to two groups: in one, fee-for-service was replaced by a global capitated budget; in the other, by a mix of global capitated budget and pay-for-performance.
Working Paper 6892, May 2014

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Publications (2008-2014)

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The map shows research on human development by research department staff, 2008-2014.

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Adam Wagstaff
Adam Wagstaff





Last updated: 2014-06-27




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