Click here for search results

Newsletter

Site Tools

Brain Drain

Non-Bank Author:Frederic Docquier, Abdeslam Marfouk
Web Address:International Migration and Development
Topics:Trade
Report Number:WPS3381
Citation: 

The database covers 92.7 percent of the OECD immigration stock.

In absolute terms, the authors show that the largest numbers of highly educated migrants are from Europe, Southern and Eastern Asia, and, to a lesser extent, from Central America. Nevertheless, as a proportion of the potential educated labor force, the highest brain drain rates are observed in the Caribbean, Central America, and Western and Eastern Africa. Repeating the exercise for 1990 and 2000 allows the authors to evaluate the changes in brain drain intensity. Western Africa, Eastern Africa, and Central America experienced a remarkable increase in the brain drain during the past decade.

The database delivers information that is rich enough to assess the changes in the international distribution of migration rates, to test for the (push and pull) determinants per skill group, to evaluate the growth effects of migration on source and destination countries, and to estimate the relationships between migration, trade, foreign research and development, and remittances.

Access to Dataset
  • Brain Drain database (MS Excel file, 1.89mb)





  • Permanent URL for this page: http://go.worldbank.org/K9KLU3V591


    © 2016 The World Bank Group, All Rights Reserved. Legal